#social

Shadows of Liberty

Ninety percent of American media is controlled by five big, for-profit-conglomerates, creating a media monopoly of informational and social control never before possible. The overwhelming collective power of these firms raises troubling questions about democracy. Using a handful of in-depth cases out of a vast array of examples, speaking with renowned journalists, activists, and others, Shadows of Liberty reveals the hidden machinations of the news media, drawing into focus the vast mechanisms of censorship, cover-ups, and corporate control that have been built up over many decades. Journalists are prevented from pursuing controversial news stories, people are censored for speaking out against abuses of government power, and individual lives are shattered as the arena for public expression has been turned into a vessel for advertising, warmongering and distraction. Will the Internet remain ‘free’, or succumb to the same control by the same handful of powerful, monopolistic corporations—as we see?

#censorship #corporations #freedom #information #media #memory #propaganda #social #control #documentary

https://thoughtmaybe.com/shadows-of-liberty/

Shadows of Liberty
Ninety percent of American media is controlled by five big, for-profit-conglomerates, creating a media monopoly of informational and social control never before possible. The overwhelming collective power of these firms raises troubling questions about democracy. Using a handful of in-depth cases out of a vast array of examples, speaking with renowned journalists, activists, and others, Shadows of Liberty reveals the hidden machinations of the news media, drawing into focus the vast mechanisms of censorship, cover-ups, and corporate control that have been built up over many decades. Journalists are prevented from pursuing controversial news stories, people are censored for speaking out against abuses of government power, and individual lives are shattered as the arena for public expression has been turned into a vessel for advertising, warmongering and distraction. Will the Internet remain 'free', or succumb to the same control by the same handful of powerful, monopolistic corporations--as we see?

Simon

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhMIPB2LblA

"The #News" is a #Social #Construct. It is Used to Program You.

If all the "alternative" #media ever does is report on "the news" (as decided by the MSM), then aren't they just unwitting participants in the #mockingbird #media #system? Join James for this heady thought for the day as he dissects the idea of "the news" and talks about the real value of an outlet like The #Corbett #Report.


giggles 108**

The #Antidote To #Shock

The relatively sudden and ubiquitous reorganization of #human #time and activity accompanying #television had little historical precedent. #Cinema and #radio were only partial anticipations of the #structural changes it introduced. Within the space of barely fifteen years, there was a mass relocation of #populations into extended #states of relative #immobilization. Hundreds of millions of #individuals precipitously began spending many #hours of every #day and #night sitting, more or less #stationary, in close proximity to #flickering, #light-emitting objects. All of the myriad ways in which #time had been spent, used, squandered, endured, or parcellized prior to #television #time were replaced by more uniform modes of #duration and a #narrowing of #sensory #responsiveness. #Television brought equally significant changes to an external #social world and to an #interior #psychic landscape, scrambling the relations between these two poles. It involved an immense displacement of #human #praxis to a far more circumscribed and unvarying #range of relative #inactivity.

Gavart Gamhag

The #Antidote To #Shock

The relatively sudden and ubiquitous reorganization of #human #time and activity accompanying #television had little historical precedent. #Cinema and #radio were only partial anticipations of the #structural changes it introduced. Within the space of barely fifteen years, there was a mass relocation of #populations into extended #states of relative #immobilization. Hundreds of millions of #individuals precipitously began spending many #hours of every #day and #night sitting, more or less #stationary, in close proximity to #flickering, #light-emitting objects. All of the myriad ways in which #time had been spent, used, squandered, endured, or parcellized prior to #television #time were replaced by more uniform modes of #duration and a #narrowing of #sensory #responsiveness. #Television brought equally significant changes to and external #social world and to an #interior #psychic landscape, scrambling the relations between these two poles. It involved an immense displacement of #human #praxis to a far more circumscribed and unvarying #range of relative #inactivity.

Gavart Gamhag

I've said lately that I'm concerned not only about how our #social and #cognitive ways of dealing with each other generally have changed, but also concerned about a major loss of quality in how I communicate specifically. Well, this 2-y/o #TEDtalks video drifted to my attention today, and it's well timed.

It's a factual account told by someone who was partly to blame for ...well, the entire #English-speaking planet uniting over #Twitter to destroy a woman, over a joke that didn't play well due to the framing limitations of keeping things under 140 characters.

The title is misleading to a degree because TED, or for that matter anyone with any #marketing sense, might assume nobody would have the guts to watch something with a title that spoils this particular surprise. But maybe you have the #courage and #honesty to go there -- maybe you're sick of watching #civilization crumble and wondering if your #anger and #angry #habits have anything to do with it.

I think an #honest title for the video would have been: "the one and only truly systematic, intrinsic problem with current #SJW #culture, is, by itself, a big enough problem to destroy #society." Or, yknow, something like that, but after a lot more editing.

This video will make just about anyone a better person in less than 20 minutes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAIP6fI0NAI


Nathan Hawks

О том, как ВКонтакте собирает информацию о нас

Публикую просто так, для ознакомления. Пользователям Диаспоры эти сливы не грозят, ибо (я надеюсь!) :) они "ФКонтахтиком" и не пользуются. Ну а хомячкам, как обычно, "мненечегоскрывать" - и потому данная информация на них не подействует.

Владислав Велюга (vlad805)

Часть 1: http://telegra.ph/O-tom-kak-VKontakte-sobiraet-informaciyu-o-nas-07-29 Часть 2: http://telegra.ph/O-tom-kak-VKontakte-sobiraet-informaciyu-o-nas-chast-2-07-31

#VK #VKontakte #bigbrother #spying #security #privacy #social #web #internet #proprietary #network #nonfree #lang_ru

О том, как ВКонтакте собирает информацию о нас: часть 2
Перейти к первой части. Update 2 А еще давайте сразу, вот что ответил (где-то) Андрей Рогозов про данную информацию. >>> Моя статья о сборе информации о пользователях официального приложения ВКонтакте под Android уж слишком разошлась в Интернете. Я заметил, что не так уж и мало людей относится к конфиденциальности своих данных не наплевательски и приняли материал довольно "тепло". Обсуждения в комментариях под моим постом в ВК тоже оказались довольно интересными. Туда пришел бывший разработчик этого самого…

Rami Rosenfeld

The Washington Post: 98 personal data points that Facebook uses to target ads to you

By Caitlin Dewey https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2016/08/19/98-personal-data-points-that-facebook-uses-to-target-ads-to-you/

Say you’re scrolling through your Facebook Newsfeed and you encounter an ad so eerily well-suited, it seems someone has possibly read your brain.

Maybe your mother’s birthday is coming up, and Facebook’s showing ads for her local florist. Or maybe you just made a joke aloud about wanting a Jeep, and Instagram’s promoting Chrysler dealerships.

Whatever the subject, you’ve seen ads like this. You’ve wondered — maybe worried — how they found their way to you.

Facebook, in its omniscience, knows that you’re wondering — and it would like to reassure you. The social network just revamped its ad preference settings to make them significantly easier for users to understand. They’ve also launched a new ad education portal, which explains, in general terms, how Facebook targets ads.

“We want the ads people see on Facebook to be interesting, useful and relevant,” a Facebook spokesperson said.

But it remains to be seen whether users are pleased or frightened by the new information they suddenly have.

Targeting options for Facebook advertisers*

  1. Location
  1. Age
  1. Generation
  1. Gender
  1. Language
  1. Education level
  1. Field of study
  1. School
  1. Ethnic affinity
  1. Income and net worth
  1. Home ownership and type
  1. Home value
  1. Property size
  1. Square footage of home
  1. Year home was built
  1. Household composition

*Not even conclusive!

As explained on that shiny new portal, Facebook keeps ads “useful and relevant” in four distinct ways. It tracks your on-site activity, such as the pages you like and the ads you click, and your device and location settings, such as the brand of phone you use and your type of Internet connection. Most users recognize these things impact ad targeting: Facebook has repeatedly said as much. But slightly more surprising is the extent of Facebook’s web-tracking efforts and its collaborations with major data brokers.

While you’re logged onto Facebook, for instance, the network can see virtually every other website you visit. Even when you’re logged off, Facebook knows much of your browsing: It’s alerted every time you load a page with a “Like” or “share” button, or an advertisement sourced from its Atlas network. Facebook also provides publishers with a piece of code, called Facebook Pixel, that they (and by extension, Facebook) can use to log their Facebook-using visitors.

  1. Users who have an anniversary within 30 days
  1. Users who are away from family or hometown
  1. Users who are friends with someone who has an anniversary, is newly married or engaged, recently moved, or has an upcoming birthday
  1. Users in long-distance relationships
  1. Users in new relationships
  1. Users who have new jobs
  1. Users who are newly engaged
  1. Users who are newly married
  1. Users who have recently moved
  1. Users who have birthdays soon
  1. Parents
  1. Expectant parents
  1. Mothers, divided by “type” (soccer, trendy, etc.)
  1. Users who are likely to engage in politics
  1. Conservatives and liberals
  1. Relationship status

On top of that, Facebook offers marketers the option to target ads according to data compiled by firms like Experian, Acxiom and Epsilon, which have historically fueled mailing lists and other sorts of offline efforts. These firms build their profiles over a period of years, gathering data from government and public records, consumer contests, warranties and surveys, and private commercial sources — like loyalty card purchase histories or magazine subscription lists. Whatever they gather from those searches can also be fed into a model to draw further conclusions, like whether you’re likely to be an investor or buy organic for your kids.

When combined with the information you’ve already given Facebook, through your profile and your clicks, you end up with what is arguably the most complete consumer profile on earth: a snapshot not only of your Facebook activity, but your behaviors elsewhere in the online (and offline!) worlds.

  1. Employer
  1. Industry
  1. Job title
  1. Office type
  1. Interests
  1. Users who own motorcycles
  1. Users who plan to buy a car (and what kind/brand of car, and how soon)
  1. Users who bought auto parts or accessories recently
  1. Users who are likely to need auto parts or services
  1. Style and brand of car you drive
  1. Year car was bought
  1. Age of car
  1. How much money user is likely to spend on next car
  1. Where user is likely to buy next car
  1. How many employees your company has
  1. Users who own small businesses
  1. Users who work in management or are executives

These snapshots are frequently incomplete and flawed, we should note — after all, they rely on lots of assumptions. But generally speaking, they’re good enough to have made Facebook an advertising giant. In the second quarter of 2016, the company made $6.4 billion in advertising, a number that’s up 63 percent from the year before. And now, Facebook ads aren’t only on Facebook.com and its acquired apps — they also populate an external Audience Network.

“Speaking as both a consumer and as an advertiser, I think that Facebook’s ad capabilities make internet advertising a better experience overall,” said Kane Jamison, a Seattle-based marketer who has written about his experience with Facebook ads. “The majority of promoted topics that I see in my Facebook feed are relevant to my interests, and they’re worth clicking on more often.”

Not everyone is quite so convinced that Facebook’s targeting methods are benevolent, though. Peter Eckersley, the chief computer scientist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, calls them “the most invasive in the world.”

Yes, he acknowledges, many companies use data brokers to make direct-mail lists, and almost every website utilizes some kind of tracker or cookies — but no company on earth, save Facebook, bundles all that information.

  1. Users who have donated to charity (divided by type)
  1. Operating system
  1. Users who play canvas games
  1. Users who own a gaming console
  1. Users who have created a Facebook event
  1. Users who have used Facebook Payments
  1. Users who have spent more than average on Facebook Payments
  1. Users who administer a Facebook page
  1. Users who have recently uploaded photos to Facebook
  1. Internet browser
  1. Email service
  1. Early/late adopters of technology
  1. Expats (divided by what country they are from originally)
  1. Users who belong to a credit union, national bank or regional bank
  1. Users who investor (divided by investment type)
  1. Number of credit lines

Take the example of the ad for your mother’s local florist: that might have been targeted to women from your hometown (which you’ve told Facebook) whose mothers’ birthdays are coming up (that’s in your Facebook calendar), who live away from family (based on off-site activity) and who have a high estimated income (according to Acxiom).

Or the mystery of the spoken Jeep joke and displayed the car ad — an adjacency that actually happened on local Florida TV, convincing one newscaster that Facebook “eavesdropped” on her. Facebook actually sources data from IHS Automotive, an industry intelligence firm used widely by dealers, banks and financial analysts, and doesn’t need eavesdropping to know that your car’s 10 years old and you might be back in the auto market.

“Facebook’s business model is to amass as much first-party and third-party data on you as possible, and slowly dole out access to it,” Eckersley said. “If you’re using Facebook, you’re entrusting the company with records of everything you do. I think people have reason to be concerned about that.”

  1. Users who are active credit card users
  1. Credit card type
  1. Users who have a debit card
  1. Users who carry a balance on their credit card
  1. Users who listen to the radio
  1. Preference in TV shows
  1. Users who use a mobile device (divided by what brand they use)
  1. Internet connection type
  1. Users who recently acquired a smartphone or tablet
  1. Users who access the Internet through a smartphone or tablet
  1. Users who use coupons
  1. Types of clothing user’s household buys
  1. Time of year user’s household shops most
  1. Users who are “heavy” buyers of beer, wine or spirits
  1. Users who buy groceries (and what kinds)
  1. Users who buy beauty products
  1. Users who buy allergy medications, cough/cold medications, pain relief products, and over-the-counter meds

Eckersley’s main concern is how much consumers know about all this tracking — and how much they’re able to opt out of it. Facebook says it’s been transparent on both counts, and that the revamped ad preferences dashboard, as well as the long-standing “Why Am I Seeing This Ad?’ dropdown, is only the latest proof that it’s dedicated to user privacy.

But while both the dashboard and the dropdown will rid you of ads you don’t like, neither actually lets users opt out completely of any of Facebook’s four tracking methods. The preferences manager, for instance, lets users tell Facebook they don’t have certain interests that the site has associated with them or their behavior, but there’s no way to tell Facebook that you don’t want it to track your interests, at all.

Likewise, Facebook allows users to opt-out of advertisements based on their use of outside websites and apps. But that doesn’t mean that Facebook never tracks those people when they’re on other sites, Eckersley said: It just limits some of its more all-seeing methods. And while Facebook did push its data-broker partners to adopt better privacy measures when it began working with them in 2013, each broker still requires you to file an opt-out request with them individually.

  1. Users who spend money on household products
  1. Users who spend money on products for kids or pets, and what kinds of pets
  1. Users whose household makes more purchases than is average
  1. Users who tend to shop online (or off)
  1. Types of restaurants user eats at
  1. Kinds of stores user shops at
  1. Users who are “receptive” to offers from companies offering online auto insurance, higher education or mortgages, and prepaid debit cards/satellite TV
  1. Length of time user has lived in house
  1. Users who are likely to move soon
  1. Users who are interested in the Olympics, fall football, cricket or Ramadan
  1. Users who travel frequently, for work or pleasure
  1. Users who commute to work
  1. Types of vacations user tends to go on
  1. Users who recently returned from a trip
  1. Users who recently used a travel app
  1. Users who participate in a timeshare

There is another option, of course: If Facebook tracking freaks you out, simply don’t use it. There are people who want targeted, “relevant” ads — and there are others, like Eckersley, who can’t stomach it.

But wait, what was that? Eckersley has Facebook? Surely hell just froze over.

“It’s the paradox of modern life,” he laughed, adding that he needs the site to keep in touch with friends and family. “We’re strongly incentivized, by the culture around us, to use this technology. It’s incredibly useful — and an incredibly giant structural problem for our privacy.”

ru_RU:

https://geektimes.ru/post/279856/#comment_9534416

  1. Место нахождения
  1. Возраст
  1. Поколение
  1. Пол
  1. Язык
  1. Уровень образования
  1. Экспертиза
  1. Школа
  1. Этническая принадлежность
  1. Доходы и прибыль
  1. Домовладение и тип владения
  1. Основные ценности
  1. Площадь владений
  1. Метраж дома
  1. Год, когда дом был построен
  1. Состав домашнего хозяйства
  1. Пользователи, у которых будет день рождения в течение 30 дней
  1. Пользователи вдали от семьи или родного города
  1. Пользователи, которые являются друзьями с кем-то, у кого скоро будет день рождения, женитьба или обручение, которые недавно переехали, или скоро отпразднуют день рождения
  1. Пользователи в междугородних отношениях
  1. Пользователи в новых отношениях
  1. Пользователи, которые недавно вышли на новое место работы
  1. Пользователи, которые недавно обручились
  1. Пользователи, которые недавно вступили в брак
  1. Пользователи, которые недавно переехали
  1. Пользователи, которые празднуют дни рождения в ближайшее время
  1. Родители
  1. Будущие родители
  1. Матери, разделенные на «группы»
  1. Пользователи, которые скорее всего вовлечены в политику
  1. Консерваторы и либералы
  1. Семейное положение
  1. Работодатель
  1. Промышленность
  1. Должность
  1. Класс офиса
  1. Интересы
  1. Пользователи, которые владеют мотоциклом
  1. Пользователи, которые планируют купить автомобиль
  1. Пользователи, которые покупали в последнее время автозапчасти или аксессуары
  1. Пользователи, которым могут понадобиться детали для машины или услуги сервиса
  1. Стиль и марка автомобиля, который вы водите
  1. Год, когда автомобиль был куплен
  1. Возраст автомобиля
  1. Сколько денег пользователь может потратить на следующий автомобиль
  1. Где пользователь может купить следующий автомобиль
  1. Сколько сотрудников работает в вашей компании
  1. Пользователи, которые владеют малым бизнесом
  1. Пользователи, которые работают в менеджменте или являются руководителями
  1. Пользователи, которые жертвовали на благотворительные цели (разделенные по типу)
  1. Операционная система
  1. Пользователи, которые играют в веб-игры
  1. Пользователи, которые владеют игровой консолью
  1. Пользователи, которые создали событие в Facebook
  1. Пользователи, которые использовали Facebook Payments
  1. Пользователи, которые потратили больше среднего на Facebook Payments
  1. Пользователи, которые управляют страницами в Facebook
  1. Пользователи, которые недавно загружали фотографии на Facebook
  1. Интернет-браузер
  1. Емейл-хостер
  1. Пользователи, которые рано или поздно подхватывают новые технологии
  1. Эмигранты
  1. Пользователи, которые связаны с кредитным союзом, национальным банком или региональным банком
  1. Пользователи-инвесторы (разделенные на инвестиционные типы)
  1. Количество кредитных линий
  1. Пользователи, которые активно используют кредитные карты
  1. Тип кредитной карты
  1. Пользователи, которые имеют дебетовую карту
  1. Пользователи со сбережениями
  1. Пользователи, которые слушают радио
  1. Предпочтение в ТВ-шоу
  1. Пользователи, которые используют мобильные устройства
  1. Тип подключения к интернету
  1. Пользователи, которые недавно приобрели смартфон или планшет
  1. Пользователи, которые имеют доступ к интернету через смартфон или планшет
  1. Пользователи, которые используют купоны
  1. Какую одежду юзер покупает
  1. В какое время года пользователь больше всего закупается
  1. Пользователи, которые «очень» часто покупают пиво, вино или спиртные напитки
  1. Пользователи, которые покупают бакалею (и какую)
  1. Пользователи, которые покупают косметические товары
  1. Пользователи, которые покупают лекарства (дальше был список от чего лекарства)
  1. Пользователи, которые тратят деньги на товары для дома
  1. Пользователи, которые тратят деньги на продукты для детей или домашних животных
  1. Пользователи, которые делают больше бытовых покупок, чем некая средняя планка
  1. Пользователи, которые склонны делать покупки в интернете (или в оффлайне)
  1. Тип ресторанов, где пользователь ест
  1. Типы магазинов, в которых пользователь закупается
  1. Пользователи, которые являются «восприимчивыми» для предложений от компаний, предлагающих онлайн-автострахование, высшее образование или ипотеку и предоплаченных дебетовых карт/спутниковое телевидение
  1. Сколько времени пользователь живет дома
  1. Пользователи, которые могут переехать в ближайшее время
  1. Пользователи, которые заинтересованы в Олимпийских играх, футболе, крикете или Рамадане
  1. Пользователи, которые часто путешествуют для работы или для удовольствия
  1. Пользователи, которые ездят на работу
  1. Тип отпуска, в который ездит пользователь
  1. Пользователи, которые недавно вернулись из поездки
  1. Пользователи, которые недавно использовали приложение для путешествий
  1. Пользователи, которые участвуют в «тайм-шер» виде отпуска

This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. Mark Elliot Zuckerberg, aka Mark Zuckerberg, is the chairman and CEO of Facebook. This caricature of Mark Zuckerberg was adapted from a Creative Commons licensed photo from Presidencia de la República Mexicana's Flickr photostream. Date 25 November 2016, 19:11 Source Mark Zuckerberg - Caricature Author DonkeyHotey

#facebook #zuckerberg #bigbrother #spying #security #privacy #social #web #internet #proprietary #network #nonfree #lang_ru

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Rami Rosenfeld