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100,000 Pages of Chemical Industry Secrets Gathered Dust in an Oregon Barn for Decades — Until Now

https://theintercept.com/2017/07/26/chemical-industry-herbicide-poison-papers/

100,000 Pages of Chemical Industry Secrets Gathered Dust in an Oregon Barn for Decades — Until Now
Carol Van Strum didn’t set out to be the repository for the people’s pushback against the chemical industry. Then her property was sprayed with 2,4,5-T.

bumi haymarket
seconds ago

US cuts ties to Syrian rebel group over ‘objectives inconsistent with defeating ISIS’

Image/photoRT - Daily news

US cuts ties to Syrian rebel group over ‘objectives inconsistent with defeating ISIS’

Image/photoThe US-led coalition said it would no longer support the Syrian armed opposition group known as Shuhada al-Qaryatayn, or Shuq, because the group pursued goals other than fighting Islamic State (IS, former ISIS/ISIL).
Read Full Article at RT.com

US cuts ties to Syrian rebel group over ‘objectives inconsistent with defeating ISIS’
The US-led coalition said it would no longer support the Syrian armed opposition group known as Shuhada al-Qaryatayn, or Shuq, because the group pursued goals other than fighting Islamic State (IS, former ISIS/ISIL).

RT - Daily News (Unofficial)
10 minutes ago

CIA torture case may go to trial if 2 psychologists don’t sway judge

Image/photoRT - Daily news

CIA torture case may go to trial if 2 psychologists don’t sway judge

Image/photoThree former CIA detainees who underwent enhanced torture methods claim that two psychologists should be held responsible for the suffering they experienced at the hands of the agency.
Read Full Article at RT.com

CIA torture case may go to trial if 2 psychologists don’t sway judge
Three former CIA detainees who underwent enhanced torture methods claim that two psychologists should be held responsible for the suffering they experienced at the hands of the agency.

RT - Daily News (Unofficial)
10 minutes ago

GOP splits further as 'skinny' Obamacare repeal may get rewritten in conference

Image/photoRT - Daily news

GOP splits further as 'skinny' Obamacare repeal may get rewritten in conference

Image/photoFour Republican senators are threatening an 11th hour vote on healthcare reform ahead of the August recess. They want guarantees that the latest Senate effort to repeal and replace Obamacare won’t be in the final version approved by the House.
Read Full Article at RT.com

GOP splits further as 'skinny' Obamacare repeal may get rewritten in conference
Four Republican senators are threatening an 11th hour vote on healthcare reform ahead of the August recess. They want guarantees that the latest Senate effort to repeal and replace Obamacare won’t be in the final version approved by the House.

RT - Daily News (Unofficial)
11 minutes ago

#Sailing #Ottawa River today, my US 22 #sailboat #Vesper goosewinging with a whisker pole fitted!

#boat #boating #sail #sailing

Adam Hunt
11 minutes ago

Republican ex-congressman slammed for shaming homeless man on Instagram

Image/photoRT - Daily news

Republican ex-congressman slammed for shaming homeless man on Instagram

Image/photoFormer Republican congressman-turned Fox News talking head Jason Chaffetz was eviscerated on social media for posting a photo to his Instagram account mocking a homeless man using a smartphone.
Read Full Article at RT.com

Republican ex-congressman slammed for shaming homeless man on Instagram
Former Republican congressman-turned Fox News talking head Jason Chaffetz was eviscerated on social media for posting a photo to his Instagram account mocking a homeless man using a smartphone.

RT - Daily News (Unofficial)
11 minutes ago

Online-Video: Für was Cola alles gut ist

{width="200"} Man sollte nicht glauben, für was man Cola alles einsetzen kann wie z.B. Kaugummi entfernen, Toilette putzen, Mückenstiche behandeln, Rost entfernen und vieles mehr. Unfassbar das Zeug :-)

https://funpot.net/?150601
#fun #bot #rss #funny #humor #witz

Für was Cola alles gut ist
lustiger Clip 'Für was Cola alles gut ist.mp4'- Eine von 491 Dateien in der Kategorie 'Wissenswertes' auf FUNPOT. Kommentar: Man sollte nicht glauben, für was man Cola alles einsetzen kann wie z.B. Kaugummi entfernen, Toilette putzen, Mückenstiche behandeln, Rost entfernen und vieles mehr. Unfassbar das Zeug :-)

rss_bot@pod.dapor.net
11 minutes ago

Scaramucci also told me he had no interest in media attention. “I’m not Steve Bannon, I’m not trying to suck my own cock ” This reminds me of something. Has anyone tapped Ron Jeremy for this post?

professor rat
12 minutes ago

Hey everyone

Project M
17 minutes ago

VIDEO: Hirono Questions Russia Meddling

WASHINGTON D.C. - The United States Senator from Hawaii interviews William Browder on the alleged tactics of Russian oligarchs to interfere and influence world leaders.

http://www.bigislandvideonews.com/2017/07/27/video-hirono-questions-russia-meddling/

bigislandvideonews_unofficial
18 minutes ago

Killing and dying for minerals

Source: Future of Freedom Foundation
by Jacob G Hornberger

“Americans might soon have a new reason to thank the troops for their service, at least in Afghanistan, where the troops have been killing and dying for almost 16 years. According to an article in yesterday’s New York Times, ‘President Trump, searching for a reason to keep the United States in Afghanistan after 16 years of war, has latched on to a prospect that tantalized previous administrations: Afghanistan’s vast mineral wealth, which his advisers and Afghan officials have told him could be profitably extracted by Western countries.’ If that doesn’t say it all, I don’t know what does. How do empire and foreign interventionism become more morally perverse than that?” (07/27/17)

https://www.fff.org/2017/07/27/killing-dying-minerals/

Originally posted at: http://rationalreview.com/archives/264266

Rational Review News Digest
20 minutes ago

New here! I'm getting use to how this works.

zeeetheenz@socialhome.network
22 minutes ago

US-Sanktionen gegen Russland: US-Sanktionen: Strafen, die auch Europa treffen
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WDR (inoffiziell)
11 minutes ago (edited)

With The European Union Livid, Congress Pushes Forward On Sanctions Against Russia, Iran and North Korea

Image/photoThe Intercept

With The European Union Livid, Congress Pushes Forward On Sanctions Against Russia, Iran and North Korea

A rare role reversal played out in Washington on Thursday night, as the Senate took a break from debating repeal of the Affordable Care Act to pass a bipartisan bill that will serve to alienate U.S. allies and isolate America.

That job, of course, is typically reserved for President Trump, but Congress showed decisively that the administration doesn’t have a monopoly on the practice, voting 98-2 to apply new sanctions to Russia, Iran, and for good measure, North Korea, too.

The Iran sanctions threaten to blow up the Iran nuclear deal, a landmark foreign policy achievement of President Obama’s, one negotiated with both European allies and with Russia and China. The Russian sanctions have been met with threats of retaliation not just from Russia but from the European Union, which is apoplectic that the U.S. is threatening to undo its regional energy policy. And the North Korean sanctions, well, nobody really knows what those will do.

The bill passed in the House 419-3 with little objection. When the Senate took up a similar sanctions bill last month against Russia and Iran, the measure passed overwhelmingly, with Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Rand Paul, R.-Ky., the only dissenting voices. They were again the only dissenters Thursday.

Sanctions bills against U.S. adversaries usually sail through Congress uncontested, and on a bipartisan basis. Few members of Congress want to vote against sanctions, fearful that the move could be spun into an attack ad that accusing them of being pro-Russia or pro-Iran.

The bill has the enthusiastic backing of Democrats, who are looking to punish Russia for its election interference. Since several of the meetings between Trump administration and Russian officials reportedly discussed sanctions relief, coverage of the Trump-Russia scandal has dwarfed any discussion of how U.S. allies are likely to respond to new sanctions.

The sanctions may be a symbolic move for Congress, but they are very real to Europeans who do business with neighboring Russia. On Sunday, the European Union indicated that they would retaliate against additional sanctions on Russia, fearful that they would impact energy companies. A memo obtained from Brussels by the Financial Times said that the EU should “should stand ready to act within days” if the bill was “adopted without EU concerns taken into account.”

Even the French government — which has allegedly faced its own election inference by Russia – spoke out against the sanctions. The French Foreign Ministry on Wednesday said the sanctions appeared to violate international law, and that the European Union would have to respond due to the impact on firms.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., told The Intercept that the concerns of U.S. allies come second to the need to punish Russia for its election interference. “I just looked at the sanctions, and it’s very hard, in view of what we know just happened in this last election, not to move ahead with [sanctions],” she said.

When asked about international repercussions, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., a Senate newcomer who many are speculating for a presidential run, said she would be concerned about the response of allies. “That’s part of the issue, isn’t it? We have to think about it in the context of our partners and friends. I do have concerns, yes,” she said after voting for the sanctions bill.

Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., said he was satisfied that the EU concerns had been addressed. “I looked at those concerns last night,” he said. “I know there were a number of changes made to the legislation to address the legitimate concerns. In other words, my view is that we effectively addressed the major concerns that were expressed.”

Yet Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., one of the leading champions of sanctions with Russia, said that it was the job of the EU to come around to the legislation, not for the legislation to be brought around to them. “I hope they’ll come around,” he told The Intercept of the EU. “Not that I know of,” McCain said of any changes to the bill to accommodate them. “Certainly not in the portion of the bill I was responsible for.”

Another author of the bill, Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., an ardent foe of the Iran deal, said that very little was done to take the EU concerns into account. “Not much, to be honest with you,” he told The Intercept. “There was some sense of the Congress that we should consult with our allies, and there was something actually done for — more about U.S. companies than about Europeans — about any joint ventures that might include a Russian partner on oil. But other than that, nothing much.”

Illinois Democratic Senator Dick Durbin, said that international allies concerns’ could be resolved diplomatically in the future. “This would be the type of thing that in the ordinary course of diplomacy our Secretary of State and Secretary of Commerce would be sitting down with leaders in the EU to resolve any misunderstandings. I don’t believe the relationship of this administration with the EU has been that positive, and obviously there’s some skepticism about what our motives are.”

In addition, the new Iranian sanctions threaten to jeopardize the 2015 Iran deal negotiated by President Obama. Despite the fact the Trump administration has levied its own sanctions against Iran, the administration has certified that Iran is complying with the deal.

While the Iran sanctions bill was at an early stage, former Secretary of State John Kerry spoke out against it, saying it would jeopardize the Iran nuclear deal.

And Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has threatened to retaliate tit for tat. According to Reuters, Iranian state media quoted the president on Wednesday referencing a verse from the Quran, saying “If the enemy puts part of their promises underfoot then we will also put part of it underfoot. And if they put all of their promises underfoot then we will put promises underfoot.”

President Trump has not taking a clear position on the bill. White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci told CNN on Thursday that the President may sign the bill into law as is, or may even consider vetoing the measure.

Menendez said he wasn’t overly concerned with the European reaction, and that it was up to the administration to smooth it over. “I’ve lived through this through every sanction I’ve ever authored and it will take the administration’s leadership to make sure we bring our allies together,” he said.

TOP PHOTO: Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) leaves a meeting of GOP senators in the U.S. Capitol June 22, 2017 in Washington, DC.

The post With The European Union Livid, Congress Pushes Forward On Sanctions Against Russia, Iran and North Korea appeared first on The Intercept.

With The European Union Livid, Congress Pushes Forward On Sanctions Against Russia, Iran and North Korea
Congress tells the EU it doesn't care what it thinks about its Russia sanctions.

The Intercept (Unofficial)
29 minutes ago

E And J Gallo Sends Cease And Desist Trademark Notice To E And B Beer

Image/photoTechdirt.

E And J Gallo Sends Cease And Desist Trademark Notice To E And B Beer

It's been a refreshing bit of time since we've last written about a silly trademark dispute in the beer and alcohol space, so perhaps you, the dear Techdirt reader, had thought that the complete fuster-cluck that is trademark and alcohol had somehow begun to calm the hell down. Sadly, not so much, it seems. To serve as one reminder, E & J Gallo, maker of wines and spirits and a company that has previously demonstrated its inability to tell different kinds of drinks apart, has sent a cease and desist notice to E & B Beer, a company that makes, you know, beer.

> The case pits well known wine and liquor company E and J Gallo against E and B Beer. The owner of Eand B, Santo Landa, says he sees no similarity and feels like this is a case of a big company trying to stomp out the little guy.E and B Beer has been around since the late 1800s in Detroit. It's already been trademarked once before.
>
> Since buying the brand, Landa applied for his own trademark but he's run into a roadblock. An attorney for E and J sent a legal notice saying similarities may cause confusion for customers.
So, let's start with the names of each company. It should be immediately clear that any concern about confusion between the two names is fairly silly. The only similarity between them is the "E and" at the start of each name. Everything else about the names is distinct, from the second initial used to the inclusion of another name (Gallo) and the other mark's description of what the product is (beer). Even if we set aside my personal quest to have the Trademark Office realize that beer, wine, and spirits are all distinct industries and should be treated as such for the purposes of trademark, there's little likelihood of confusion purely from the names of each business. Add to that the logos for each company are beyond distinct and it seems clear that confusion ain't going to be a thing.

Image/photo
Image/photo

None of each company's various iterations of their logos appear to be any more similar than the above. Other than the start of the name and both logos having red in them, there's just nothing there. Certainly not enough to rise to the level of trademark infringement. Which is probably why Landa himself can't figure out what the issue is and sees this as nothing more than a bullying attempt by a larger company.

> "I'd like to get an explanation as to what they think is confusion," he says.
>
> The most troubling thing for Landa? He insists he can win a legal fight, but not without big money - money he simply doesn't have.
Now, E and J Gallo apparently offered Landa the rights to keep his name, but only if he limited his sales to 2 states. If you think that's reasonable, you aren't paying attention, because there's nothing remotely like trademark infringement here and there is no reason for Landa to give up his right to sell anywhere at all, never mind limiting himself to 4% of the country's states.

Permalink | Comments | Email This Story

Image/photo Image/photo
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E And J Gallo Sends Cease And Desist Trademark Notice To E And B Beer
It's been a refreshing bit of time since we've last written about a silly trademark dispute in the beer and alcohol space, so perhaps you, the dear Techdirt reader, had thought that the complete fuster-cluck that is trademark and alcohol had...

Techdirt
31 minutes ago

US-Sanktionen: Strafen, die auch Europa treffen

#auch #die #europa #sanktionen #strafen #treffen

Tagesschau (inoffiziell)
31 minutes ago

existe il a l'heure actuelle, des #telephone #portable qui a l'instar du #nokia #n900 tournent sous #gnu #linux ?

#gsm #maemo #question #informatique

Scheindorf Herljos
33 minutes ago

This Chart Might Make You Rethink The Adage "Stocks Always Come Back"

Image/photoZero Hedge

This Chart Might Make You Rethink The Adage "Stocks Always Come Back"

Authored by Jeff Clark via GoldSilver.com,

It was a pretty simple inquiry on my part: Mike Maloney predicts the stock market is facing the mother of all crashes - if he’s right, then how long before the average stock investor would get back to even?

I wanted to know not only for myself, but because I have a daughter just starting in her career. I also have a wife with a 401k and over a decade to retirement. I have a son in college. I handle my retired parents’ money. And I have other family and friends who follow traditional brokerage advice and have 60% of their portfolios in stocks (or more in some cases).

So, if the stock market crashes, how long does history say it’ll take for their stock holdings to return to pre-crash levels… months? Years? Or—gulp—decades?

It’s an important question, because the answer will tell you how to invest depending on your timeframe. And if the answer ends up being “a long time”, well, you might consider sidestepping the stock market altogether if you, too, are nervous about its frothy nature.

At this point the average stock broker will pull out a looong term chart of the S&P and show that over time—despite numerous crashes and corrections and bear markets—the stock market ultimately marches higher. History does show this to be true on a nominal basis, further bolstered by the investor who is dollar cost averaging and reinvesting dividends (though these charts always exclude commissions and fees).

But when I saw one of those charts from my broker many years ago, I did notice one thing: over the past 100 years or so, there were a handful of crashes that not only looked like the Grand Canyon, they took a long time to recover. “What if that happened to my portfolio?” was the question I immediately muttered to myself.

Years later, after recalling my Dad’s grumbling about inflation in the late 1970s, I had a second question: if the Dow did end up taking a protracted time to get back to even, wouldn’t inflation erode my real rate of return? If it took a portfolio-killing ten years, for example, I might have earned back that $20,000 I lost, but now the car I’d planned to buy with that money cost not $20,000 but $30,000. Or $40,000. Show me all the long-term charts you want but I still can’t afford to buy that car.

So here was my inquiry:_ in the biggest market crashes, how long has it historically taken the S&P to return not to its pre-crash price, but to the inflation-adjusted level?_ By asking this question, I felt like I’d be better equipped to not just handle a major downturn but decide if I should be in the market at all.

Here’s what I discovered. In the four biggest stock market crashes since 1900, the inflation-adjusted recovery periods were all measured in decades.

Image/photo

Inflation rates obviously varied during each period, but even low inflation adds up over time. So even when the nominal price of the S&P climbed back to the prior peak, it had taken so long that that amount of money would no longer buy as much. Your brokerage statement might show a gain, but in real terms you’d still be underwater. It’s a sobering realization, one that dawns on most people only when they go to actually spend the money.

Here’s the breakdown of each recovery period:

  • Beginning in 1906, it took the S&P 500 index 20 years to get back to its inflation-adjusted, pre-crash level. No wonder; the total amount of inflation during that time period was 74.0%.
    • Deflation was the name of the game in 1929, of course, with inflation readings registering as low as -10.3% during the Great Depression. But the S&P had fallen so far that inflation returned before it could recover… inflation totaled 48.7% during the 26-year time span, resulting in the S&P not reaching breakeven until 1955.
      • From 1973 to 1987, inflation totaled a whopping 104.0%. High inflation rates combined with the depth of the crash made stocks “dead money” during that 14-year span.
        • And those “low” inflation readings we’ve had since the new millennium? It totaled 35.2% over the first decade and a half, and led to the S&P taking 14.5 years to regain its full purchasing power. This silent erosion kept unsuspecting investors in the red, on a real basis, until 2015.
          • It’s worth pointing out that the Nasdaq still has not recovered from the bursting of the internet bubble. It lost 78% of its value in the crash, and adjusted for inflation is still down 17.6% (as of 6-30-17) from its March 2000 peak! In other words, almost two decades later, tech stocks are not back to the same level of purchasing power, despite the index being higher on a nominal price.Clearly, the biggest stock market crashes in history have been big enough that inflation played a key role in their recovery.

            So, if you think the stock market is at risk of a crash—and there are plenty of signs pointing to that being the case—then you may want to consider stepping aside for a time being, and look to start buying again after the crash.

            Perhaps a more effective solution is to buy the one asset that is not just inversely correlated with stocks (meaning it tends to rise when stocks fall), but is also one of history’s best inflation hedges, even in hyperinflation.

            If the stock market crashes and inflation kicks in, this asset just might be one of the few offensive weapons left in your portfolio. History says now is a good time to put that hedge in place.

            Image/photo

            Image/photo

GoldSilver.com
Jeff Clark, Senior Precious Metals Analyst, GoldSilver.com It was a pretty simple inquiry on my part: Mike Maloney predicts the stock market is facing the mother of all crashes—if he’s right, then...

Zero Hedge
an hour ago

I'd Nuke China - US Admiral Confirms He'd Launch Missiles If Trump Ordered

Image/photoZero Hedge

I'd Nuke China - US Admiral Confirms He'd Launch Missiles If Trump Ordered

Admiral Scott Swift, Commander of the US Navy’s Pacific Fleet, said he would obey a hypothetical order to launch a nuclear strike against China if the president chose to give it. As AP reports, the remarks follow the director of the CIA’s recent assessment that Beijing poses a major threat to the US in the long run.

In a rare interview this week, CIA Director Mike Pompeo asserted that China is more of a long-term threat to US national security than any other world power, including Russia.

> “It's hard to pick between China, Russia and Iran to be honest with you. I guess if I had to pick one with a nose above the others, I'd probably pick China,” Pompeo told the Washington Free Beacon on Wednesday.
>
> “They have a real economy that they have built, unlike Russia that lives and dies on how many barrels of oil they can pluck out of the ground. And Iran that is similarly very single sector derivative and not to the scale of China population-wise,” the intelligence chief explained.
>
> According to Pompeo, Beijing is willing to become a near-peer opponent to the US.
>
> “I think it’s very clear when they think about their place in the world, they measure their success in placing themselves in the world where they want to be vis-à-vis the United States and not as against anyone else,” he said.
This led someone to ask The US Pacific Fleet chief, who was speaking at an Australian National University security conference on Thursday, whether he would initiate a nuclear strike against China at President Donald Trump's orders 'next week'?

Image/photo

The admiral bluntly said:

> "The answer would be: Yes."
Swift, who has led the Pacific Fleet since 2015, explained:

> “Every member of the US military has sworn an oath to defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign and domestic and to obey the officers and the president of the United States as commander and chief appointed over us.”
He then struck a conciliatory tone, saying:

> “This is core to the American democracy and any time you have a military that is moving away from a focus and an allegiance to civilian control, then we really have a significant problem.”
Following Admiral Swift's comments, Pacific Fleet spokesman Captain Charlie Brown explained that he was referring to the principle of civilian control over the armed forces.

> "The admiral was not addressing the premise of the question, he was addressing the principle of civilian authority of the military," Brown said.
>
> "The premise of the question was ridiculous."

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Zero Hedge
an hour ago

Hegemony Is A Three-Player Game

Image/photoZero Hedge

Hegemony Is A Three-Player Game

Authored by James Rickards via The Daily Reckoning,

Three-player games are easy to model - it’s always two against one. The art of geopolitics and examining hegemony powers in such situations is to be part of a duo that pressures the remaining player, or, at a minimum, keep the other two players separated.

This is basic balance-of-power politics as practiced since the rise of Napoleon (1799), with antecedents in the Treaty of Westphalia (1648), and Machiavelli’s The Prince (1532).

Image/photo

The case for normalizing relations between Russia and the U.S. rests on the coming confrontation between the U.S. and China.

This confrontation stems from China’s refusal to help the U.S. deal decisively with North Korea, which is pushing the U.S. toward a pre-emptive war on the Korean peninsula.

Other flashpoints with China include conflicting claims in the South China Sea, currency manipulation, trade subsidies, theft of intellectual property, and cyber-warfare.

These conflicts were held in abeyance while China was given “100 days” (from the Mar-a-Lago summit on April 6, 2017 to July 15, 2017) to help with North Korea. Now that the 100 days are up and China has failed to deliver, the gloves are off. The months ahead will witness increasing tension and specific actions by the U.S. aimed at China.

To secure the U.S. position in this conflict and as a simple matter of statecraft, the U.S. needs improved relations with Russia as an offset to deteriorating relations with China.

Russia can assist the U.S. is numerous ways. First and foremost is Syria. Russia and the U.S., along with indigenous forces from Iraq, Jordan and the UAE, are well down the path of eliminating ISIS as a political entity. (ISIS will remain as a terrorist incubator along with Al Qaeda franchises and their respective sympathizers).

A modus vivendi can be reached where Russia and their Ba’athist allies, U.S.-backed rebels, Kurds, and Turkey all have separate spheres of influence in Syria. The loser in this scenario is Iran, which has been a leading backer of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad.

Russia can also help the United States on the North Korean dossier even though China has proved unable or unwilling to do so. Russia has enormous economic leverage in North Korea. Private intelligence service STRATFOR reported the following on July 11, 2017:

> Russia shipped $2.3 million worth of oil products to North Korea between January and April 2017, a 200 percent increase, Yonhap and Korea Times reported July 11. Last year, North Korea reportedly turned to Russia after experiencing difficulty securing oil supplies from China. A North Korean defector suggested Russia supplies North Korea with 200,000 to 300,000 tons of fuel annually via a company in Singapore. North Korea’s increased dependence on Russian fuel indicates its anticipation of tougher international sanctions following its recent intercontinental ballistic missile launch on July 4.
By stepping into China’s shoes as a supplier to North Korea, Russia has increased its leverage over North Korea and therefore has increased its ability to assist the United States. This type of leverage is one of the few paths to a resolution of the North Korean nuclear issue without resorting to war. It is of enormous value to the U.S. and argues in favor of improved U.S.-Russian relations.

The foregoing is an overview of the greatest political struggle in the world today. The nationalists and realists want to improve U.S. relations with Russia. The globalists are horrified at the prospect and want to maintain warm relations with China while isolating Russia.

Hegemony and Geopolitical Struggle
The White House has already decided in favor of Russia.

The problem is how to execute that plan in the face of withering attacks about phony scandals from the media, Democrats, resistance and globalists.

The standard globalist attack on Putin says he is an autocrat at best, a dictator at worst, who murders some political enemies, jails others, and suppresses dissent in Russia.

This is all true.

The rebuttal is that China is worse. President Xi is an actual dictator, not a presumed one. He presides over a top-down Communist dictatorship. China slaughtered thousands of innocent protestors in the Tiananmen Square demonstrations in 1989 and has refused to allow any acknowledgement of it ever since.

The Chinese dissident, Liu Xiaobo, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2010 for his efforts to advance the cause of human rights and political freedom in China. He died while in custody on July 13, 2017 after decades in prison and political reeducation camps. Xi’s political enemies, such as former Chongqing party chief Bo Xilai, have been arrested and subjected to torture and imprisonment.

In short, human rights and respect for political dissent leaves no basis for choosing between Russia and China. Both Putin and Xi are thuggish, with Putin being subject to slightly more pluralistic constraints, while Xi basks in the glow of globalist approval.

The choice between them boils down to power politics, not who wins a globalist beauty contest. Trump is tilting toward Russia for good reasons of realpolitik.

As evidence for this tilt, following the July 7 meeting between Trump and Putin at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, Trump said:

> People said, ‘Oh they shouldn’t get along.’ Well, who are the people that are saying that? I think we get along very, very well. We are a tremendously powerful nuclear power, and so are they. It doesn’t make sense not to have some kind of a relationship.
The bottom line is that relations with Russia will improve materially while relations with China will deteriorate materially in the months and years ahead.

This has huge implications for capital markets and your portfolio.

It is up to the United States to defend its monetary ground. However, the likelihood of that is low because the U.S. does not even perceive the problem it’s facing, let alone the solution.

This evolving state of affairs creates enormous opportunities for investors in the coming months ahead.

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Hegemony is a Three-Player Game - The Daily Reckoning
The art of the deal has collided with geopolitics. For investors that can navigate through global hegemony powers, opportunity is endless...

Zero Hedge
an hour ago

I like this #picture 😁 #photo

Daniel Xtantiono
an hour ago

Cobots: Mensch und Roboter arbeiten zusammen

#arbeiten #cobots #mensch #roboter #und #zusammen

heise iX (inoffiziell)
an hour ago

mb 5.0 SOLOMON ISLANDS
Earthquake, Magnitude 5.0 - SOLOMON ISLANDS - 2017 July 28, 00:47:26 UTC

earthquake
an hour ago

M 4.6 WESTERN IRAN
Earthquake, Magnitude 4.6 - WESTERN IRAN - 2017 July 28, 01:04:28 UTC

earthquake
an hour ago

ᶰᵉˣᵗ ᶫᵉᵛᵉᶫ

Exousia &amp; Dunamis
an hour ago